Stooges Forum
Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.

Stooges Forum

Welcome to the Fun House
 
HomeHome  RegisterRegister  Log in  

 

 Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)

Go down 
+2
steve_lobotomy
Borntohula
6 posters
AuthorMessage
Borntohula




Number of posts : 283
Registration date : 2007-02-28

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeThu Mar 01, 2007 3:10 pm

I just found this one

Quote :
He's sixty, you know. But Iggy's still got it - sort of.
Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) 2halfstars

People who terrified me as a kid: Mr Cox, Iggy Pop and Rolf Harris.

Mr Cox because he was a sadistic little git who became a teacher to indulge his hatred of children (but I’ve come to terms with that, oh yes . . .); Rolf Harris because of his cheery, beardy didgeridoo-strangeness; and Iggy because he was the first singer I’d ever seen (and this was post-Stooges) who genuinely didn’t give a fuck if I liked him or not, who looked at me and everyone else with a wired, wiry, scarred-armed, bare-chested, hippy-hating contempt and a self-contained nihilistic rage that was bottled up in a punk container that seemed to have little of the rock’n’rollness of the Clash, little of the cartoonness of the Dolls or the Ramones or the Damned, little of the distanced, sneering cabaret knowingness of Rotten/Lydon, little of the reverent, soul-60’s sensibility of the Jam. Jim Morrison was Iggy’s hero, but you could never really see that in his performances or his music. He seemed, rather, more aligned to the mutilating East Coast screams of Richard Hell, or (earlier on) the Fugs or MC5, to the painful yells of the more extreme end of the Velvets or to Sun Ra or Beefheart or Zappa but without all the jazzy cleverness. And- to be honest- I quickly placed him in the ‘I’m glad he’s there and I know he’s important and iconic and all that but I can live life without him . . .’, and I turned away from him for twenty-five years (perhaps to avoid the discomfort of his certainty and fire) as he continued on his merry Bowie-helped/hindered, with Stooges/without Stooges, over-produced/under-produced, drugged-up/drugged-up way.

Until now.

When I expected- what? Well . . . I expected (from reports of the band's live shows over the last couple of years) scratchy, distorted, widdling lead guitar over hard, hard punk-blues rhythm riffing, functional bass and drums propping up an angry old man spitting out invigorating barely-in-tune bile and sarcasm at a world that he never felt part of and never wanted him. I expected skinny-powerful, drug-addled-smart, focused-apathetic, lean-muscular, out-of-time, messy, self-harming, three-chord idiotically visceral raw power, libidinous and labile, hurt and sadistic, way, way over the border. I expected no hint that any more music had been made after 1980, no pansy bleeding electronica, no hip-hop, no Smithsy jangle, no Nirvana even, no nothing but the basics. What I expected was that we’d both have grown older, but only one of us had changed . . .

And some of that power and purity, some of those extremes, some of that stubborn, individualistic, idiosyncratic fuck-youness is still there: the first four tracks here make a nicely slicing, deliciously burning, winkingly spirited assault on all the crap that’s happened in all our lives, all the crap that passes for music, for rebellion, for anger, for art. Those first twelve minutes or so it’s like nothing’s changed- he’s still (quite) scary (despite the thin reediness of his voice) and still making me righteously uncomfortable, albeit with the help of music that’s now familiar, unapologetically nostalgic, more overtly rooted in the sped-up rock’n’roll that punk always really was. Trollin', the first track, is typical: catchy(ish) mid-tempo rock, undercut with feedback and snarl, original Stooges the Asheton brothers propelling things loosely along; You Can't Have Friends is rough-hewn, flat-sung, live-sounding with neat little references to Britpunk; ATM is noisy and Dollsy (‘Don’t bullshit a bullshitter’); My Idea Of Fun ( '. . . is killing everyone') sees Ron Asheton’s guitar in metallic question-and-answer mode with Iggy’s nihilistic/anti-war (it’s hard to tell) words. Good stuff. One-dimensional, but good stuff.

If he’d stopped here (and maybe added in the fabulous, steaming psychobilly of later track, Mexican Guy) the album would’ve been a pretty decent pop-punk return, a more than listenable shake-up. But the slowed-up mid-period Bowie pastiche, Weirdness (which contains nothing of the sort) comes dimly, despondently along and slowly sucks the life out of the listener and, it turns out, much of the rest of the album. The following Free And Freaky isn’t either really, it’s musically formulaic, post-punkjokey (pokey?) clatter; Greedy Awful People, again, is clumsy satire; She Took My Money is worryingly close to big-hair metal; End Of Christianity reminds you of bad Manic Street Preachers (is that a tautology?); sax-haunted Bowie parody number two Passing Cloud is wearying old-bloke resignation. And, finally, I'm Fried finishes things off with the band sounding far too much like Chelsea or Eater or the UK Subs- Iggy means it, man, on this one but, musically, the Stooges are League 2 UK Punk.

It's over. I'm knackered. Five good ‘uns and a lot of filler. A better percentage than a lot of albums, but Iggy ain’t going to change lives in the way he once did. He’s just not terrifying any more: maybe we’ve both- we've all- moved on.

When’s Rolf’s new one out?

Release date: 05/03/07
Artist website: www.iggypop.com
Label: Virgin
Back to top Go down
Borntohula




Number of posts : 283
Registration date : 2007-02-28

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeThu Mar 01, 2007 8:54 pm

http://www.themusicnazi.com/?p=606 wrote:
I’ve had enough time to listen a few rounds, chatted with my tattoo artist about it while getting some new ink. . .and I’ve come to this conclusion. James Osterberg Jr. (a.k.a. Iggy Pop) just doesn’t fucking stop. Now, what we have to keep in mind is that we have an album here from a band that broke up in 1973 - after releasing a tri-fecta of probably the purest and best garage punk rock ever. Well, 10 years before real punk rock “broke”. The Stooges, man . . . . . . .the Stooges are just fucking amazing. They were doing shit in the late 60’s that punk bands were trying to mimic in the late 70’s.

Fun House - may be one of the greatest albums of the 70’s and should be in the Top 5 Greatest Punk Albums of All-Time. Yet I digress. The one common ground in all of their previous albums was the sound. It was raw, powerful and dirrrrrrty. It really gave you a feeling as to what a live show would be like with them. Scary.

The Weirdness sounds exactly like what it is. A couple of late 50/60 year old rockers, getting together and doing what they used to do best. They’re not writing Grammy material. They’re writing dirty rock and roll. Now, while Iggy does a good job of writing about the similar gross/shocking material he used to - and producer Steve Albini (Nirvana’s Heart-Shaped Box - genius). . . .does a pretty damn good job of mainting the integrity of the sound of the band. . . . .the album has like a fuzz of over-production to it. It’s just a little too clean. I almost think they should have done this either White Stripes-ish or the Black Keys-ish. . .in a basement with no fancy shit. Just mics.

Its good for entertainment value - Iggy as a performer can never be outdone. This is what it is. . . .an album by old punk rockers.

It still holds more water than a lot of the other shit that is being spewed out today, however.
Back to top Go down
steve_lobotomy

steve_lobotomy


Number of posts : 11
Registration date : 2007-02-26

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeFri Mar 02, 2007 4:40 am

Great reading. Thanks for posting.
Back to top Go down
http://www.myspace.com/thelobotomys
Borntohula




Number of posts : 283
Registration date : 2007-02-28

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeMon Mar 05, 2007 1:31 pm

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/filmandmusic/story/0,,2024448,00.html wrote:
When the Stooges' unholy triumvirate of albums - The Stooges, Funhouse and (with a rejigged line-up) Raw Power - defined rock's unhinged nihilism, Iggy Pop was able to brilliantly mythologise his alienated, drug-crazed self as a "streetwalking cheetah with a heart full of napalm". Now he has reunited with the Asheton brothers for their first full album in 33 years, and their tickers are more likely to contain pacemakers than incendiaries - but that uncomfortable fact doesn't explain why The Weirdness fails so lamentably.
With the once-explosive Ron Asheton laying down shockingly rudimentary punk riffs, the old Stooges struggle to erect a tribute to themselves. The crooned title track throws some unexpected Doors-like shapes, but Pop's lyrics about his penis and ATMs are beyond self-parody. Trollin' - "I see your hair as energy/ My dick is growing tall as a tree" - may actually be the dumbest thing he has recorded. The Stooges bowed out in 1974 amid a torrent of raw eggs: finally, The Weirdness responds in kind. Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Guardian1
Back to top Go down
Borntohula




Number of posts : 283
Registration date : 2007-02-28

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeWed Mar 07, 2007 2:41 pm

allmusic.com wrote:
The creative and interpersonal dynamics of a rock band are notoriously tricky, and when a band hasn't worked together for a few decades, simply getting the same people together in a recording studio doesn't guarantee lightning is going to strike again. In 2003, more than 30 years after the original lineup of the Stooges collapsed after the commercial failure of Fun House, Iggy Pop finally buried the hatchet with his former bandmates Ron Asheton and Scott Asheton, and they hit the road for a series of heroic reunion shows (with Mike Watt standing in on bass for the late Dave Alexander) in which they miraculously re-created the dinosaur-stomp sound and feel of their first two albums. After the riotous reception of the Stooges' reunion shows, Iggy and the Ashetons took the next logical step and recorded a new Stooges album, but while the reconstituted band sounded stunning on-stage (check out the Telluric Chaos CD or the Live in Detroit 2003 DVD for evidence), in the studio the Stooges reunion went horribly awry with 2007's The Weirdness. It would have been foolish to expect The Weirdness to sound just like The Stooges or Fun House, given how much water has flowed under the bridge, but what's startling is how little this album recalls the primal groove of their previous work (or the sound they recently delivered on-stage). While Ron Asheton's guitar howls as loud as ever, the pulsating wah-wah and ripsaw fuzz that were his aural trademarks are all but missing, and while his solos step back into the noisy id, they lack the coherence and internal logic of his brilliant work on Fun House. Similarly, Scott Asheton's drumming is muscular and his timing is superb, but while he created an unexpectedly sensuous groove out of stuff like "Down in the Street," "1969," and "Real Cool Time," here he stomps away with lots of gravity but little nuance, and like his brother, he's traded soul for jackhammer force (emphasized by Steve Albini's hard-edged recording). But surprisingly, the guy who really drops the ball on this set is Iggy. Pop's been in fine voice on his last few solo albums, but much of The Weirdness finds him singing a bit flat or sharp, and while he belts out these songs with commendable passion, this ranks with Beat Em Up as the dumbest set of lyrics the man has ever committed to tape. Instead of reaching into the Real O Mind for the cosmic simplicity of stuff like "TV Eye," "1970," or "I Wanna Be Your Dog," Iggy goes into inane blather mode from the jump-start, and if titles like "Greedy Awful People," "Free and Freaky," and "I'm Fried" don't tip off listeners that he's off his game, lines like "England and France, these cultures are old/The cheese is stinky and the beer isn't cold," "They drive those f*ckin' awful cars/And roll their lips in titty bars," and the deathless "My dick is turning into a tree" tell the rest of the story. While Ron and Scott may not be at their best here, when they connect (and sometimes they do) you can imagine The Weirdness might have been an OK rock album, especially with Mike Watt's solid, workmanlike basslines and Steve Mackay's free-skronk saxophone. Iggy's songs, however, sink this particular ship, and if this doesn't conclude the Stooges saga on as crushing a note as Metallic K.O. brought down the curtain on their first era, there's no denying The Weirdness is a major disappointment that puts a real chink in this great band's legacy..

Interesting with the review is that they gave the CD 3/5.
Back to top Go down
Gimme some skin




Number of posts : 349
Age : 37
Location : Belgium
Registration date : 2007-03-10

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeSat Mar 10, 2007 12:10 pm

Here's a link to the RS Review. They're surprisingly positive for RS.
http://www.rollingstone.com/reviews/album/13502342/review/13711225/the_weirdness
Back to top Go down
Borntohula




Number of posts : 283
Registration date : 2007-02-28

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeSat Mar 10, 2007 7:31 pm

Gimme some skin: About the Rolling stone review. The same thing goes for the swedish medias. People are saying that they're dissapointed in the album, but it has some songs that's almost -up there!
The album has gotten more or little less 3/5 from every swedish reviewer!
Back to top Go down
Barman




Number of posts : 23
Registration date : 2007-03-13

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeTue Mar 13, 2007 7:11 am

Back to top Go down
Katy




Number of posts : 33
Location : London, U.K.
Registration date : 2007-03-10

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeWed Mar 14, 2007 2:20 pm

I know Q magazine gave it 2/5 stars.

Mojo magazine gave it 4/5 stars.

One of the free London papers gave it 3/5.
Back to top Go down
Borntohula




Number of posts : 283
Registration date : 2007-02-28

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeWed Mar 14, 2007 9:15 pm

Katy: What did Mojo have to say about it? 4/5 is quite a score for The weirdness.
Back to top Go down
Katy




Number of posts : 33
Location : London, U.K.
Registration date : 2007-03-10

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeFri Mar 16, 2007 6:06 pm

I was kind of surprized to see Mojo give it that score too. I typed it up, here's the review in full:

Cash from chaos
Ann Arbor's wildest have cut a new LP, three decades after the last one. By Manish Agarwal

The Stooges
****
The Weirdness (Virgin)

Ignored at the time, the first three Stooges records are now seen as proto-punk landmarks: 1969's deadpan nihilistic debut; 1970's molten masterpiece Funhouse and 1973's sleazy, volatile Raw Power. Each one was different, but all of them united disaffected thought and visceral expression, their songs becoming standards for generations of iconoclastic upstarts. Trying to extend such a pioneering hot streak is surely risking bathos?
Happily, this particular group of revered geezers is not inhibited by history. Most reunion shows are stifled by a need to maintain the legend. In contrast, since reforming in 2003, The Stooges have performed at maximum volume with a minimum of nostalgia, obliterating expectations by simply being themselves. As Iggy Pop noted during the making of this album: "When you put something before the public, you're like a kid going to high school for another day. If you were a cheerleader Monday, you damn well better bring those pompoms Tuesday."
Save for one enforced change - Minutemen bassist Mike Watt replaces the late Dave Alexander - this is the original line-up: Scott 'Rock Action' Asheton (drums), older brother Ron (guitar) and Iggy on vocals. Steve Albini's tough, unvarnished recording doesn't try to modernise the quartet's elemental chemistry, ensuring that these 12 tunes pack an almighty sonic punch. 'Trollin' sets the tone, the Ashetons churning up a concrete slab of riff'n'rhythm as Iggy cruises the streets for action: "I got the top down on my Cadillac/My sweetest t-shirt is riding my back/Rock critics wouldn't like this at all/I guess my faith is right in my balls." The singer turns 60 this year, but his core concerns are still getting laid and trying to get paid, 'ATM''s superhero strut claiming that, "The Stooges fight poverty in secret."
An undervalued lyricist, Iggy can take society's temperature with one hand and flip it the bird with the other. Garage punk sing-alongs 'Free & Freaky' and 'Greedy Awful People' pledge allegiance to outsider America while kicking against the neocon pricks; 'My Idea Of Fun''s topical sarcasm - "now is the season for war with no reason" - is amplified by Ron's blistering axe. The wah-wah-crazed guitarist sounds righteous whether he's spotlighting Iggy's basso profundo on the title track's downer blues or wallowing in gutter-psych grime with Funhouse saxophonist Steve Mackay ('Passing Cloud', 'I'm Fried').
You could argue that this is reinventing the wheel, but that misses the point. 'The Weirdness' is the sound of a working band, rock'n'roll lifers doing what they need to do in the here and now. On those terms, no matter what, The Stooges are still hard to beat.
Back to top Go down
StoogesMySpaceAdmin

StoogesMySpaceAdmin


Number of posts : 726
Location : a secret location in the Nevada desert
Registration date : 2007-03-19

Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitimeMon Mar 19, 2007 1:13 pm

Nah. The reviewers don't get it. It's what the fans think. Sales don't lie.
Back to top Go down
http://www.myspace.com/iggyandthestooges
Sponsored content





Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)   Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines) Icon_minitime

Back to top Go down
 
Reviews of the album(from sites and magazines)
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Stooges Forum :: Stooges Main. :: Jesus Loves the Stooges.-
Jump to: